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Building Confidence in Children

Are you helping or hindering your child’s self-esteem and feeling of confidence? Say your child tries to carry their bowl of food and a beaker of juice across the room, then trips and spills everything. Do you say ‘I told you not to do that! Now see what you have done!’ It is tempting but it would be much more helpful to say something like ‘Oh dear, you tried, but it didn’t work. Don’t worry. Next time you can try carrying things one by one’. This way your child is not made to feel worse than he already does for failing at trying to do something. Also, it is important to bear in mind that it is not only what your child directly hears you saying but what he also overhears you telling other people like, ‘he’s so clumsy!’ or ‘he never learns’. This can leave the child feeling that this is the absolute unchangeable truth.

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7 Common Mistakes First-Time Parents Make

Parenting is one of the hardest jobs you will ever have, and no stage is more difficult than the first few months with your first child. It is easy to be led astray by misguided assumptions and poorly thought-out plans, and it is practically impossible to completely avoid making any mistakes. Parenting is after all a learning process, but you can avoid some of the most common mistakes simply by being aware of them in advance. Here are seven of the most common issues that arise for first-time parents.

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The 6 Most Important Parent-Child Talks

No one said parenting was going to be easy. As children grow up, countless issues can arise, and as parents it is our job to try to guide our children through these times to the best of our abilities. An essential part of this job is to talk to our children about serious issues that kids face. These talks are not always easy, and they can be downright uncomfortable for both parent and child. However, they are crucial for a child’s development, and they are also useful for establishing the lines of communication.

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Helping Kids deal with Anger

Anger is something that kids learn. From too much violence on television, to video games, the internet, and music, violent images and words surround us all. While adults can listen to or view these things without having them directly impact the way they behave or treat others, children are an entirely different matter.

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The Importance of Teaching Kids About Money

These days, too many people do not learn about money and finance until it is far too late. Americans now hold more debt than ever before, and this is at least in part due to the fact that many of us have had no financial education. Sadly, this has led to millions of cases in which individuals do not begin to get serious about their finances until they are in their 30s or 40s and already thousands of dollars in the hole.

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A Parent’s Guide to Cyberbullying

By Lisa Pecos

There have always been bullies, but the internet has given mean kids a whole new platform to bully others, and this new platform comes with some serious concerns that parents need to be aware of. Many people tend to think that being on the receiving end of occasional bullying is a normal part of childhood, and that it might even build character. But as recent events have shown, cyberbullying is a serious matter and needs to be treated as such.

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How to Beat the Childhood Obesity Epidemic

By Marc Courtiol

According to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control, nearly 20 percent of American children between the ages of 6 and 11 are now obese, and 18 percent of young people between ages 12 and 19 meet the criteria for obesity. These numbers are startling enough on their own, and they do not even take into account the children who are officially overweight but not obese. All in all, one third of American children are bigger than they should be.

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Our Nations Most Powerful Educators; The Parents

By Tiffany Chappelle

‘Oh, I wish I had the time!’ are the words most often uttered from other parents when I mention I read to my two sons, ages six and eight every single night for a minimum of thirty minutes. I am torn between insult by this comment, which suggests that I am not as busy as they are, and pity they and their children are being denied such an amazing experience. I see this time as essential not only for reconnecting with my boys after a day apart, as a chance to snuggle and be affectionate, or to create a magical, bonding moment that will be treasured for a lifetime, but also as a chance to practice our listening, comprehension, and vocabulary skills. No, I don’t have a degree in education, and I am not striving for one. But the day a person becomes a parent they are given the honor and responsibility of being the primary and most influential educators in their child’s life. A mother or father is the first educators a child encounters, the ones that know their children best, and the ones who should have the highest interest in their children’s success in school. It’s a tragedy that we as parents in this country are not living up to this important role in our children’s lives.

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Signs Your Child May Have ADHD

By Jamell Andrews

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is believed to affect about 4 million kids in the U.S. and millions more throughout the world. Over the last several years, ADHD has often been seen a trendy diagnosis, with many people dismissing it as a mere personality trait rather than a problem that warrants treatment. But while there are actually some benefits to mild ADHD, any parent of a severely ADHD child knows that this condition can be quite detrimental, especially when it comes to school. Kids with ADHD often have trouble focusing in class, and they tend to act up in ways that may earn them reputations as problem students.

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Study: Parents at Risk of Postnatal Depression

By Jamell Andrews

A study just released by the Medical Research Council in the U.K. reveals that postnatal depression (also known as postpartum depression), which has been well documented among women, also affects a substantial percentage of new fathers. Looking at a group of 86,957 families, the study found that 39% of mothers experience at last one episode of depression within the first 12 years of being a parent, while 21% of men experience an episode. These findings raise new questions about the emotional effects of parenting and highlight the importance of mental health treatment for young parents of both sexes.

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Children and Illness: The Main Reasons that Kids Miss School

By Cyndra Neal

Many parents can probably relate to having a child who seems to be sick all the time. Often times, parents find themselves wondering why their kids get sick so often. They may even feel like their kids are sick more often than other people’s children. The reality, however, is that most kids get sick several times a year, particularly when they are younger.

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Teaching Kids about Money

By Marc Courtiol

While many parents often mention the fact that they wish they had learned more at an early age about how to handle money, many of them are surprisingly hesitant to discuss such matters with their own children. This seems a bit odd, since so many of us wish that our children had a better grasp of the reality that money does not grow on trees; nor is it available in an endless supply for the majority of us.

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Helping Children Deal with Divorce

By Jamell Andrews

Divorce is a stressful event for everyone involved. Just because parents are the two individuals who are directly going through the process, it does not mean that the children involved are immune from the negative effects. For the most part, the various reactions that children have to news of divorce will depend upon their ages, temperament, and the specific circumstances that surround the divorce.

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Risk, Adventure, and Your Child – LifeJackets

By Brendan Madden

A rogue gust capsized the small sailboat, sending the Farley-McSorley family tumbling into the waters of Lake Fairlee. As their lifejackets bobbed them back to the surface, 10-year-old Madison took charge.

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The Art of Sharing – Shared Custody

My Experiences with Shared Custody

Our breakup started and ended quickly. That said I had probably missed all the signals a failing relationship yields the whole year and half we were together. In that time we had shared an apartment, friends and our son. In hindsight we were naive to think a relationship with so little chance to grow before Austin came along would succeed. We did our best to accommodate the changes a child brings. We picked out the best daycare, bought all the necessities and read the books people suggested. Austin became the best thing in our lives. Soon it had become clear he was the only topic we could discuss without argument, the only reason we were still together.

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What to do if your Child is being Bullied

By Anna Rekal

Bullying can come in a variety of different forms, and it can start as early as preschool. Children may be picked on or teased, or they may be forced into certain behaviors or activities in order to avoid being beaten up or have their lunch money stolen.

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5 Parenting Tips for Communicating with Children & Teens

There is nothing that adequately prepares us for the most important job there is—parenting. Children and teens do not come with an owner’s manual, and most of our training is on the job. With our own parents as our most prominent role models, we tend to repeat what we have learned about parenting from them. We do our best, learn as we go, and make our own mistakes along the way; but we don’t have to leave our parenting to chance. We can become more effective parents. We can parent with more confidence instead of frustration. Parenting can be enjoyable and rewarding instead of stressful.

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Raising Happy Children

By Jamell Andrews

Raising happy children does not have anything to do with the material possessions that you give to them. Regardless of how many toys kids have or how much you try to shield them from the harsher aspects of life, the ability of children to be happy as they grow up is largely based on internal factors.

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Do Kids NEED Cell Phones?

By Cyndra Neal

This is a question that many parents find themselves wondering about, often when their children are as young as eight or nine years old. Kids are asking for technological gadgets at increasingly early ages, claiming that they need things like cell phones, video games, iPods, and laptop computers.

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Are You Aware of Eating Disorders in Adolescence

By Wendy Wood

Do you suspect that your child has an eating disorder? By watching your child’s eating habits you will soon find out if he or she, in fact, has an eating disorder. Here are is a list of tips, tricks and methods for learning more about your child’s eating habits in hopes that we can help your with your situation or to keep if from happening all together.

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Parents, Teenagers and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

By Jamell Andrews

Chronic fatigue syndrome, or CFS, is a very difficult disorder to diagnose in adults and teenagers. The primary symptom associated with chronic fatigue syndrome is extreme fatigue, which does not improve even with extended periods of rest. Though Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is one that is now widely accepted by researchers and doctors as being a legitimate illness, the exact cause of it is still unknown.

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Guess How Children Learn

Children thrive in nurturing environments, so it is important that they be introduced to learning opportunities at a very young age. In fact, the earlier you start introducing your kids to different learning tools, the better off they will be in the long run.

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The Complementary Parenting Styles of Mom and Dad

By Jamell Andrews

It is believed that children develop into who they (ultimately) are based on the confidence their parents have as parents. In other words, if mom and dad are not comfortable being parents, or if they do not exude very much self-confidence in this role, their children are likely to pick up on these feelings. This can contribute to the overall sense of insecurity or lack of self-esteem that children may feel as they grow older.

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Stepping Into a New Role: Balancing Love as a Stepmother

By Jessica Lawson

With divorce rates in America at an all-time high, it is practically inevitable that our children will be affected by broken marriages either directly or through friends. Difficulties, both emotional and physical (due to moving back and forth between residences), can threaten a child’s sense of home and blur the roles of parents.

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Old and New Natural Ways to Prevent Colds

By Marc Courtiol

If you are a parent to a baby or toddler, you are undoubtedly used to your little one having several colds each year. In fact, it may even seem like as soon as your child has finally gotten over a cold, another one mysteriously appears not far behind. While your first instinct might be to reach for the nearest over the counter cold remedy for children, many doctors are now advising against it.

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Getting your Kids to Eat Healthy Foods

By Jamell Andrews

Parents often have meal time battles with their children. The kids decide that they do not like what you are serving them, or they just decide that they would rather have something else. Whatever the reason, one of the worst things you can do as a parent is give in to your kids’ demands and fix something else for them to eat.

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Understanding Adult ADHD and Children ADHD

The first thing to understand about Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is that it is a neurobiological condition. After depression, ADHD is the second most common mental health disorder in adults, affecting about 5% of the United States population.

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How to Find the Right Preschool

Finding the right preschool for your child can be a challenge. With a variety of different options to choose from, parents can easily become overwhelmed when trying to decide which type of program would be the most suitable for their child.

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Preparing for Your Child Becoming a Teenager

As adolescents, children are attempting to acquire the skills they will need in order to achieve independence as adults. This is the time that they become their own person and create their own group of friends, and this period of transition is typically quite difficult. While some children seem to breeze through their teenage years without a care or problem in the world, the majority of them struggle daily with a variety of different issues.

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How to Lose Your Mommy Tummy

One of the hardest things that new mothers face is figuring out how to lose their mommy tummy.  The outer abdominal muscles become so stretched out during pregnancy that even once you have given birth and your uterus has shrunk back down to its normal size, it is very difficult to get those muscles back into pre-baby shape.

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Are Sunscreens Harmful for Kids Health

sunscreen_for_kids

When choosing a sunscreen for your kids health, the greatest urge may be to simply grab something off the shelf of your local drug store. There are a variety of sunscreens that are specifically marketed for children, but in reality the formulations of these sunscreens are not really that much different than the ones you find in regular formulas that are marketed for adults.

Harmful Ingredients

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Teens and Bed-Wetting : Dealing With Diapers and Plastic Pants

By Colin Ellison

Being a teenager can be a stressful time in life. There’s the pressure of fitting in,preparing to get into college,going to prom,learning to drive. Now imagine if you also had to tell someone of the opposite sex that you have to wear diapers and plastic pants because you still wet the bed?

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Math Anxiety: Are You Passing Yours On To Your Child?

by Donna Verry Dee

Karen Greenburg of Mesa Arizona hated math as a child and she sees history repeating itself with her daughter, Angela. “She’s very frustrated with math,” says Greenburg of the second-grader. “She mostly dislikes doing drills and timed tests. I think I may have passed that on to her through my poor attitude about it. I have been known to say, ‘I don’t understand why they have to memorize math facts and take timed tests.’ I think she has picked up on that and uses it to her advantage.”

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21 Days To Back-To-School Bliss

By Susan Kruger

Tips for getting your school-year off to a relaxed and productive start.

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The New Colic

By Cyndra Neal

Colic. That word strikes fear into the hearts of new moms and pediatricians everywhere. Although theories abound, very little is known about colic. It comes on as mysteriously as it disappears. Parents inundate pediatric offices and emergency rooms, sure that something is seriously wrong with their infant. Some pediatricians send the parents home with only assurances that their baby will grow out of it. But a disturbing trend is developing among many pediatricians to diagnose colic symptoms as acid reflux and to prescribe Zantac, Prevacid or other acid reflux medications without doing any diagnostic tests. Many pediatricians prescribe acid reflux medications as a test for reflux. Some mothers report their pediatricians prescribed acid reflux medications over the phone without even seeing the infant. The parents are happy because they have something to possibly alleviate the obvious pain their baby is suffering. The pediatricians are happy to be able to prescribe something that might help. The pharmaceutical companies are certainly happy. And the baby…well the baby could still be suffering from colic as well as the added side effects (restlessness, constipation) of the acid reflux medications. The baby may now be prescribed other medications to help counteract the side effects.

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Why I don’t like parent education:

By Evan Steele

As a clinical social worker, psychotherapist, parent educator, and parent, I have had the opportunity to be on “both sides of the couch,” and observe the current state of parent education. The following are some thoughts about what help is available, especially as it relates to difficult (ADHD, ODD, etc) children.

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Play! The Sanity Saver For Tough Times

By Eileen McDargh

The opposite of work is not play. It’s depression. So states psychiatrist Stuart Brown in his new book, Play: How It Shapes The Brain, Opens The Imagination And Invigorates The Soul.

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Surprising Secrets to a Successful Summer

by Toni Schutta

 

You’re probably busy planning every detail so your kids can have a memorable summer packed with vacations, summer camps, sports activities and more.

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Get Your Child to Listen the First Time!

By Toni Schutta

Shut the TV off. I said shut the TV off. I said SHUT THE TV OFF!!

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Managing Your Child’s Anger: 9 Possible Triggers and Solutions for Coping

By Toni Schutta

Has your child thrown a tantrum lately, thrown toys across the room or hit a sibling? Odds are that s/he has!

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Help Your Child Get Organized For School!

By Susan Kruger

Disorganization is the greatest complaint made by teachers and ranks as a very close second complaint from parents (rivaling fights and arguments over homework). Every teacher can tell stories about bright and intelligent students who are failing classes because they lack the organizational skills to keep track of their assignments. School counselors and psychologists talk about the huge caseloads of students that are referred to them for suspected learning disabilities, only to discover that a large percentage of these students simply lack organizational skills. It is a growing epidemic.

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Aw, Geez, Mom, Cut it Out! Good Parenting

By Kristen Taylor

Uh oh. I’ve become that parent. You know the one: I’m the mother who babies her growing children to the point of eye rolling and groaning; to the point where I’m embarrassing not only my kids, but myself as well.

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Teens and Bed-Wetting:Dealing With Diapers and Plastic Pants

By Colin Ellison

Being a teenager can be a stressful time in life. There’s the pressure of fitting in,preparing to get into college,going to prom,learning to drive. Now imagine if you also had to tell someone of the opposite sex that you have to wear diapers and plastic pants because you still wet the bed?

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Parental Decisions Regarding Bed-Wetting and Diapers

By Colin Ellison

This sharepost is a response to Guest’s comments on my sharepost “Bed-Wetting: Should Older Children, Adolescents, and Teenagers Be Required to Wear Diapers?” I realize what I’ve said is very controversial and goes against the grain of most people’s thinking(both professional and non-professional) on this subject. The point of my original sharepost was to get people to see this issue in a whole new light.

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Grappling with the Birthday Beast

by Jennifer Kirsch

A mother starts to plan her son’s birthday party five months in advance, calling the parents of children with proximate birthdays to coordinate dates. A bewildered father wonders where to corral the many toys his daughter receives for her birthday. A friend confesses her relief at learning her son would like to go fishing with a neighbor on his birthday, foregoing a party. A comic strip pictures a family going through customs en route to a birthday celebration.(1)

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Psychosocial Difficulties of Parents with Young Children with Severe Disabilities

Author: Dr Bindu Chawla, Associate Professor of Education , Touro College, Graduate School of Education, New York.

Introduction:

Being a parent has never been easy. Parenting is the job with no preparations and vacations. Senel and Akkok (1996) reported that children with disabilities have special needs that require more attention, greater vigilance and effort from parents than non-disabled children. Chronic illness in childhood has massive physical, social and psychological effects on families who are expected to raise the social adaptive child with special needs. Psychosocial (how parents and children mentally adapt to social situations) issues of parents and children with disabilities can be very traumatic for most parents. Psychosocial aspects, influences, parents and family factors all contribute to a healthy child with special needs.

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Becoming A Father – Fatherhood

by David McSweeney

“I’ve just been to the Doctor’s and told I’ve only got nine months to live!” “Really, what’s wrong with you?” “My girlfriend is pregnant….”

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Clubhouse on Wheels – Childcare

By Sylvia Wells

In this hyper-stimulating world we live in there aren’t many places you can go to enjoy quiet time with your children. That is why I make the most of my time in the car with my kids. There are no distractions, (and no escape), it’s a great time to reconnect and get to know each other a little better.

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Today’s Economy DEMANDS A Critical Skill: Optimism or Stress

By Eileen McDargh

Global warming. Water shortages. Terrorism. Failing health care system. Wars around the globe. Gas prices. Severe economic downturn. Look at the headlines and it’s enough to make you stay in bed.

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Can A Chiropractor Help My Baby?

By C. Neal

Your infant is crying constantly, uncontrollably. Your pediatrician is telling you “to wait it out” or worse – prescribing an acid reflux medicine with alarming possible side effects for reflux and colic. Chiropractic medicine may just be the alternative you’re looking for. Many parents don’t even consider going to the chiropractor for their infants but chiropractic pediatric treatment has been receiving more attention in the last 20 years.

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Dictionary For Dads™ Try The Test

by Robert Livingstone

I would like to introduce you to www.DictionaryforDads.com

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Raising Strong Children from Shaky Relationships

By Sylvia Wells

I always wanted five children, just like my mother. Even knowing they would all be boys in accordance to the needle and thread test I did when I was about ten years old. The funny thing is that, although I planned to have all these children, I didn’t put a second of thought into who their father would be. Fast forward thirteen years to find myself in a short term relationship with an egomaniac and holding a baby boy in my arms. Fast forward another five years and I’m a single mother of an only child. I was blessed with remarkable boy, but now that I was single I couldn’t imagine having any more children.

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Parenting Tips for Tough Financial Times

By Karen Sell

Parenting is tough in the best of times but today the signs of economic crisis are everywhere. A crashing stock market, failing companies, huge layoffs and lost homes. How can families cope? Survive? Some parenting tips for tough financial times.

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Mystical Flights – Poem

Mystical Flights

Night time falls gently
as the sun bids goodnight
stars sparkle with magic
in the moon’s soft light

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The Holidays, Toy Safety, and Parents

With millions of toys made in China pulled from the shelves over safety fears in recent months, deciding what to buy your children for the holidays has become an increasingly difficult decision. The holidays are dangerous enough without having to worry about giving children gifts that could potentially harm them.

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2008 Financial Crisis Raising Family Stress?

Numerous factors create stress within a family, but the current world financial crisis is hitting many homes all over the world. How does the family coupe with this type of stress?

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Top 10 Tips for Expectant Mothers

by: Annicedda

Journal: Chart your pregnancy using a pregnancy journal.

Diet: When pregnant eat foods that are nutrient rich including items from all the food groups. Important nutrients include folic acid, calcium, iron, vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin B6, vitamin B12 and Vitamin D.

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New Journal Provides Communication Tool for Separated Parents

A new journal available to separated or divorced parents allows them to communicate important information about their children to ensure a smooth transition between both homes, and peace of mind for the parents.

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Parental Leadership: The Mary Poppins Metaphor

By Brad Van Alstyne
California Institute Of Integral Studies
February 24, 2008

Existing theories on leadership are usually based on efforts we are familiar with in which leaders are easily defined (work, war, sports, etc). Little analysis to date has been placed on the role of parents as leaders outside of the social sciences where the focus of the research is usually an offshoot of psychology or childhood development. The parent as a leader is a unique focus in that there are several qualities of the parent role that are quite different from that of the typical supervisory roles we normally discuss, while at the same time it would be foolish to think of parents as anything but leaders. The disconnect in this idea is evident in the ways western society regards employment as it relates to parenthood, specifically pregnancy and the inequities with which “stay-home” parents are regarded. Few job sites provide adequate pregnancy leave, or childcare opportunities, and western society in general tends to regard stay at home parents with contempt in terms of their contribution to our vocation oriented society in which accolades are usually work achievement oriented. Society in general. The list below attempts to highlight a few significant differences which merit discussion.

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Should Men Get Involved with Breastfeeding?

Research has shown that breast-fed babies enjoy health advantages such as fewer digestive problems, colic, reflux, gas, intestinal infections, allergies and skin diseases. The babies are also at less risk of developing high blood pressure, obesity and diabetes. A study suggested they are smarter than formula-fed babies as well. That is why men should get involved with their wife, girlfriend, or family members to help with breastfeeding cores. The breast-fed babies are probably better at sports too. Although there is no current study supporting this sports theory, maybe someone can add this study their next thesis?

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Striking a Balance: Parenting, Working and Loving

Striking a balance: parenting, working and loving - Parenting - Anthony and Linda Brown Nikitta A. Foston AT 4:45 a.m., Anthony Brown, a 39-year-old computer specialist for the United States gov... More »

Study Finds a Downside to Parenting

Parenthood may be wonderful and rewarding, but it's also depressing, and the depression stays around even after the kids leave. Parents have significantly higher levels of depression than adults... More »

Book Review: Parenting Outside The Box

Written by child development specialist Diane Hawkins Summers, Parenting Outside The Box: Honoring the Spirit in Your Child is a comprehensive, step-by-step guide for parents to bolster the strengt... More »